It’s All Good? Some Thoughts on Cultural Relativism

Cultural Relativism. Some of the most common questions I hear about anthropology from outside the discipline are about cultural relativism, and for good reason. It is taught as one of the core principles of the discipline of anthropology, and yet anthropologists, social scientists and philosophers still debate how it should be applied. The debate surrounding … More It’s All Good? Some Thoughts on Cultural Relativism

Book Discussion: The Women’s Atlas by Joni Seager

  This book provides insight into “the state of women worldwide” through graphics and maps with statistics on women’s issues. Looking through this book gave me so much to think about. I already knew about some of the issues covered in the book, but seeing the exact statistics was enlightening. There are other topics that … More Book Discussion: The Women’s Atlas by Joni Seager

Study Abroad Essentials: Part 2, How to Maximize Your Time Abroad

I spent the Spring of 2015 studying abroad in Seoul, South Korea. And I have to brag on myself a little bit–I studied abroad like a boss. The months of studying and planning that I did, as well as some key choices that I made, really paid off when it came time for the actual … More Study Abroad Essentials: Part 2, How to Maximize Your Time Abroad

Book Discussion: Crazy Like Us by Ethan Watters

The full title of this book is Crazy Like Us: The Globalization of the American Psyche by Ethan Watters. I first read this book for a Psychological Anthropology class when I was an undergrad, and I’ve been revisiting it every so often ever since then (thanks Dr. Davenport!). The are three main points in this … More Book Discussion: Crazy Like Us by Ethan Watters

My Graduate Research on Welcoming Communities and U.S. Citizenship

From August 2016 through December 2018 I was a student in the Applied Anthropology Master’s Program at the University of North Texas. For much of that time I was working on my graduate thesis research project and paper. The subject of my project was interesting and timely, so I thought I’d summarize it briefly (as … More My Graduate Research on Welcoming Communities and U.S. Citizenship

An Informal Anthropological Perspective on Millennials Killing Things, Part 2

How timely is it that this article by Anne Helen Peterson on Buzzfeed was published while I’m working on my series about millennials killing things?   The essay, titled “How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation,” is insightful, emotional, and in my opinion, spot-on. I highly recommend it. I may have to write my own essay … More An Informal Anthropological Perspective on Millennials Killing Things, Part 2

An Informal Anthropological Perspective on Millennials Killing Things, Part 1

When I’m not sure what to write about, I can always count on the internet for plenty of random inspiration. One of my favorite online trends from the past couple of years is the idea that millennials (people aged approximately 18-30? 20-32?) are “killing” various things, usually by failing to spend their money. Being a … More An Informal Anthropological Perspective on Millennials Killing Things, Part 1